Universal Basic Income – What to do about wealthy people?

The idea of a Universal Basic Income seems pretty straight forward. Everyone gets a minimum payment to cover life’s costs. Sounds good, all things being equal.

But all things are not equal.

Rich people do NOT need universal basic income and indeed should not get it. Or should they?

Maybe the answer isn’t means testing the payment of UBI, it’s means-testing the ability to access it. Controlling access is not a new idea.

Take superannuation – everyone gets paid a regulated minimum amount of Super – but can only access it under certain conditions such as retirement, dire medical issues or potentially losing home due to non-payments.

Your UBI could be paid into a government-held bank account, which can be accessed dependent upon a few very simple conditions. Those conditions would need some smarter people to work out properly…

But lets ‘spitball’ some ideas to start with:

  • Your yearly income is less than 200% of the ‘average’ (median) income, or $200,000 per year (adjusted for inflation)
  • Your total asset value does not exceed 1000% of the ‘average’ (median) asset value, or $5 million (adjusted for inflation)

Continue reading Universal Basic Income – What to do about wealthy people?

It’s time – Shift the Rock (like Gough).

That classic Gough Whitlam campaign slogan “It’s Time”, is as relevant today in 2015 as it was the day his campaign launched in 1972.

The space for progressive political and economic change is once again widening, after having come under repeated attack by conservatives ever since Gough was dismissed via Double Dissolution in 1975.

At Progress, I attended a workshop called “Moving the Rock – Shifting Power for Sustained Change”, hosted by Sam La Rocca and Holly Hammond. Points raised in that workshop provided some of the key takeaways for me. Particularly, a strong reminder about the value and role of radicals. 

It’s about the intersection of what is ideal and what is ‘politically achievable’. Continue reading It’s time – Shift the Rock (like Gough).

We need each other… (The best words from Progress 2015)

If there’s one thing I took away from #Progress2015, it’s that we need each other.

We need to be actively build deep cross-campaign and inter-community relationships. Our causes are all STRONGLY connected and so are our audiences – but we as individual people are not yet, and we need to be.

So hi, I’m Luke. I run online comms for a union, consult in online comms for several popular hip hop artists and a heap of causes, and have been managing/admin in online communities since IRC in 1996.

I am very interested in the space where online communities and communication meets (positive) real world actions.

I’ve got experience in turning people out to gigs/protests/actions, crowd-sourcing for causes (or to get me to Progress!), obsessively following hashtags with up-to-the-moment live coverage of amazing events overseas when I should be sleeping, developing new friendships//meeting new people online.

Actually, I met many/most of the closest people in my life online before real life: Continue reading We need each other… (The best words from Progress 2015)

Missed the deadline. #100daysofblogging #Day76

Technically it’s Day 77 of the blogging challenge already; but I haven’t slept so I’m still counting this as a #Day76 post.

Today has been a busy day!

Working in the garden, sorting out stuff around the house that I’d been putting off for way too long, and having an interesting meeting with an important bunch of local activists.

I also put my (amateur) photoshop skills to work today, piecing together the banner below for the People’s Climate Mobilisation here in Perth on September 21.

All in all a very productive day.

Click here to join the “People’s Climate Mobilisation – Perth” on Facebook.

People's Climate Mobilisation - Perth, September 21, 2014

Online experiences depend on you. #100daysofblogging #Day73

The internet brings out both the best and worst in people.

It allows the making of pacts between people who feel the same way; pacts to survive at least one more week, pacts to stay alive, but also pacts for suicide.

It allows you to find voices that agree with what you are thinking. But it will also expose you to those who disagree and those who wish to change you.

It can be good for you or bad for you, depending on the choices you make.

The intense reality of being connected all the time and the incessant vibrating of notifications can exacerbate insomnia or other sleep problems. The background thought “I’ve got to check twitter” can damage you concentration when you need it.

But the internet can also be a place to clear your thoughts, whether it be to a friend or to someone you have never even met. I’ve often found solace in talking to someone I don’t really know about quite personal things.

Solutions to many of life’s problems can be found, when you ask for them online. Not just from your real-life friends, but from experts far and wide.

Find the right hashtag on twitter and you can have a mental health worker, doctor or psychologist reading your tweets in no time.

They may not be close by, but they are there.