LNP’s $500m decision – 1 drone or 1million solar homes? #100daysofblogging #day14

Australia spends big on militaryToday’s posts title pretty much sums it up. At last years election the LNP were promising a to contribute $500 toward installing solar at 1,000,000 Australian homes.

Why has this $500,000,000 renewable energy policy been dumped?

I don’t remember seeing them campaign on ‘building more drones’.  But there is at least $3,500,000,000 in the budget to buy 7 of them. That’s $500,000,000 per drone.

Sure camera drones help in protecting and keep an eye out for intruders but at the times of global crisis such as global warming and many other things I don’t think spending $500,000,000 per drone makes any sense. I’m happy with the camera drone I have(not comparing, just stating) for which I didn’t have to spend much but the same thing, when applied on a global level, makes no sense.

We do not need drones. We are not in the middle of a global war. We should never EVER ‘expect’ to be involved in such a war again.

If such a situation arose, conventional arms would matter little as intercontinental ballistic missiles loaded with chemical, biological or nuclear warheads would rapidly annihilate us all. This ‘mutual destruction’ guarantee has been in place for more than 50 years now. Continue reading LNP’s $500m decision – 1 drone or 1million solar homes? #100daysofblogging #day14

Australian Elections and the Insufficiency of Voting

Electoral politics can be a dirty business, especially in Australia.

The major parties, Labor (ALP) and the Liberal-National Party Coalition (LNP) play an intense, 5-week game of ‘catch-all’ policy making, and try to discredit each other.

This happens between candidates for the House of Representatives, the Senate (at this point Greens & Independents are contenders too), and at a national level between candidates for the Prime Ministership. It all plays out very publicly, streamed around the clock via television networks, media outlets and increasingly through social media and online communities.

Two overly crafted personalities are created and forced down our throats until we are so sick of them, we can’t WAIT to see that voting booth, if only to know all the excessive marketing will be over soon. Then it is over.

We have a new government and either you did or didn’t get what you ‘voted for’. Right?

For me, more often than not I DON’T get what I voted for, though the hung parliament of 2010 is the closest we have come so far. Never so far in Canning, the lower-house electorate I live in.

The truth is the majority of voters never get what they ‘voted for’. Continue reading Australian Elections and the Insufficiency of Voting

Podcast Episode 3: Armadale, 100% Renewables & ALP Leadership

This third episode of the (Un) Common Sense Podcast is a week late, as a result of a tragedy in Luke’s family last week.

Download Episode 3 – Armadale, 100% Renewables & ALP Leadership.

This weeks podcast includes:

  • My reaction to the Armadale Forum with Police Commissioner and Minister, including brief discussion on ‘privilege’ within the local community and the need for better community facilities in Armadale.
  • Comment on government paternalism + prohibition/harsh penalties vs harm reduction.
  • The need a set deadline to reach 100% renewable energy in Australia.
  • Various plans for achieving a 100% renewable energy .
  • The Greens ‘Energy 2029’ plan for Western Australia.
  • Clean Energy Act of 2011 and the Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC).
  • Reflection on change in Labor Party leadership & implications/opportunities. Continue reading Podcast Episode 3: Armadale, 100% Renewables & ALP Leadership

Kevin Rudd, reform and democratising the ALP

“We are fools if we do not understand that the public has had a gutful of what currently passes for much of our national political debate” – Kevin Rudd discussing the need for major reform within the ALP.

Kevin Rudd is correct in saying the general public is not happy with the way policy is produced by the federal Labor party. Policy should not come exclusively from the Prime Minister and Cabinet (nor the Leader of Opposition & Shadow Cabinet).

We are also unhappy with the ‘pledge’ binding OUR representatives, both MPs and senators, to vote in accordance with policy produced in this fashion. It goes against the democratic principals which once made the ALP a truly progressive party of the people, by the people, for the people.

Until recent decades Labor party policy was produced by the party’s mass membership. Members, who numbered in the hundreds of thousands, were directly responsible for suggesting, debating and approving the party’s policy platform. Once the policy was democratically approved, ALL party members were bound to it under the Labor Party Pledge. This produced a strong unified front around policy which was truly representative of the party’s membership and support base.

In this context, the Pledge ensured MPs and Senators actually acted as representatives of their support-base. Today, this is no longer the case.

Continue reading Kevin Rudd, reform and democratising the ALP