The Internet gives me hope. #100daysofblogging #Day53

A snapshot of Internet ConnectivityThe internet is one of very few things which gives me hope for the future of humanity.

Well actually it’s much more than just ‘the internet’ as a tool which give me hope.

It’s not just the sheer volume of information. It’s not just the ability to communicate instantly with dozens of people from different locations all at once.

It’s more than that.

It’s the communities I’ve become a part of and the huge variety of people I’ve met online.

From the random US citizens I spoke to on IRC in 1996, to Iraqi bloggers I met online in 2004, to local activists I met through Twitter and Facebook in 2011.

The fact that I can meet these people from the safety of my own home has made me a different person than I would have been otherwise. It broke cultural barriers and freed me from relying on mainstream sources to learn about other parts of the world.

The shareware, freeware and open source culture of online communities supply endless, high quality free to use applications for nearly every task imaginable.  Continue reading The Internet gives me hope. #100daysofblogging #Day53

Podcast Episode 1: Turkey, Filters, Monsanto and planning in WA

First episode of the (un) Common Sense podcast is up!

[powerpress]

Issues covered in this episode of the podcast include:

If you would like to suggest a topic for discussion on the (un) Common Sense podcast, head over to the #UCScast hashtag on twitter.

Yes, that is different to the hashtag originally stated, but it makes sense so we will be using it from now on.

Faiza al-Araji and Nadia – Iraqi women.

Olivebranch Network contributor and blog-mum Faiza al-Araji and Nadia from “Talking About Iraq” are two out of many Iraqi’s who have suggestions and strong emotions about how to build a peaceful  unified future for Iraqi’s. Please, follow the above links and read their suggestions on how to achieve a peaceful endgame in Iraq.

Our world is full of brilliant ideas, particularly our own little intensely political microcosm we call the blogosphere. I have spent long hours looking for suggestions which could lead towards a re-unification of the Iraqi people which would allow a rebuilding of nationalism within Iraq. I have found many articles and suggestions from Iraqi’s and foreigners alike. I have developed my own ideas over time, some of which I would no longer agree with, many of which I believe still hold true to this day.

The blogosphere is abound in ideas on how to create a better society and I personally believe the blogosphere in itself produces better examples of community than those in which our home and work lives are based. The blogosphere though highly political and full of controversy, transcends daily politics. There is little mudslinging. People who disagree tend to choose between ignoring one another or having ongoing political debates.

Unfortunately an element also tends to attack bloggers unnecessarily, but their attacks are little more than text and often simply discarded. Bloggers converse endlessly, refining our opinions, and comments are a great source of peer-review. Especially when it comes from other bloggers who you respect.

What role will blogging play in the future of media, and particularly of war and humanitarian crisis reporting? Hopefully my study of the Iraqi blogosphere and other similar uses of online communications can produce some insights worth applying to my university studies in both my Journalism and Internet Communication Technology classes.